Tuesday, October 4, 2022

What Antibiotics Are Used For A Urinary Tract Infection

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Why Should I Take The Full Dose

Urinary Tract Infections, Animation.

Antibiotics work well against UTIs. You might start to feel better after being on the medicine for just a few days.

But even so, keep taking your medicine. If you stop your antibiotics too soon, you wonât kill all the bacteria in your urinary tract.

These germs can become resistant to antibiotics. That means the meds will no longer kill these bugs in the future. So if you get another UTI, the medication you take might not treat it. Take the full course of your medicine to make sure all the bacteria are dead.

Treatment From A Gp For Utis That Keep Coming Back

If your UTI comes back after treatment, or you have 2 UTIs in 6 months, a GP may:

  • prescribe a different antibiotic or prescribe a low-dose antibiotic to take for up to 6 months
  • prescribe a vaginal cream containing oestrogen, if you have gone through the menopause
  • refer you to a specialist for further tests and treatments

In some people, antibiotics do not work or urine tests do not pick up an infection, even though you have UTI symptoms.

This may mean you have a long-term UTI that is not picked up by current urine tests. Ask the GP for a referral to a specialist for further tests and treatments.

Long-term UTIs are linked to an increased risk of bladder cancer in people aged 60 and over.

How Common Are Urinary Tract Infections

Urinary tract infections are very common, occurring in 1 out of 5 women sometime in their lifetime. Though UTIs are common in women, they can also happen to men, older adults and children. One to 2% of children develop urinary tract infections. Each year, 8 million to 10 million visits to doctors are for urinary tract infections.

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Antibiotics That Shouldn’t Be A First Choice For Uncomplicated Utis

Other antibiotics appear to be overused, and some physicians may misuse non-recommended antibiotics as first-line treatments. Ciprofloxacin is used in 35% of uncomplicated UTIs, while levofloxacin is used in 2%. These antibiotics can be important treatments in some cases of more complicated UTIs, but can have dangerous side effects.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns that the use of these drugs should be restricted because of their potentially disabling side effects involving tendons, muscles, joints, nerves and the central nervous system. Additionally, in many parts of the country, bacteria commonly causing UTIs are becoming resistant to these antibiotics.

Urine Drug Concentration And Clinical Efficacy

ASK DIS: Urinary Tract Infection: Antibiotics in Adults

Antimicrobial drugs must achieve an adequate urine concentration, which must be maintained for a sufficient time for a drug to be effective in treating UTI.16 It has been suggested that clinical efficacy is observed when the urine drug concentration is maintained at a concentration 4-fold higher than the isolates MIC throughout the time between doses.9

Experimental studies in rats have shown that the time for which the plasma drug concentration exceeds the isolates MIC correlates to the magnitude of bacterial colony count reduction the longer the time for which the drug concentration remained above the MIC, the lower the urine colony counts.12 Successful eradication of bacteria within the renal parenchyma or urinary bladder wall is correlated to the plasma, not urine, drug concentration.

When prescribing time-dependent antibiotics, shortening the interval between drug administration is the most effective method to allow the tissue/urine drug concentration to exceed the MIC for the majority of the dosing interval.

  • Drug elimination follows first-order kinetics, where 50% of the drug is lost in 1 half-life.
  • In contrast, doubling the dose would only add 1 half-life to the dosing interval.
  • To add 2 half-lives to the dosing interval, the initial dose would have to be increased 4-fold. The peak serum drug concentration achieved by this approach may exceed the window of safety, producing adverse drug effects.

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Antibiotic Treatments For Urinary Tract Infections Are Commonly Prescribed To Pregnant Women

Some antibiotic treatments for urinary tract infections , such as nitrofurantoin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, have been linked to birth defects. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends avoiding these antibiotic treatments in early pregnancy if possible. A study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found thatabout 4 in 10 women with UTIs during early pregnancy filled a prescription for nitrofurantoin or trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Healthcare providers of various specialties should be familiar with ACOGs recommendations about prescribing specific antibiotics to pregnant women and consider the possibility of early pregnancy when treating women of reproductive age. To help determine treatment options, women should inform all of their healthcare providers if they are pregnant or are planning to become pregnant.

Read the full scientific article.

What Antibiotics Are Commonly Used To Treat Urinary Tract Infections

A handful of antibiotics are used to treat the most common urinary tract infections . In 75-95% of these cases, the infection is caused by bacteria called Escherichia coli , so experts know which antibiotics work well against the infection. These antibiotics are called first-line antibiotics.

They are given orally and include:

Amoxicillin and ampicillin are no longer used because of a high level of antibiotic resistance.

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Cipro And Other Medications

Below is a list of medications that can interact with Cipro. This list does not contain all drugs that may interact with Cipro.

Before taking Cipro, be sure to tell your doctor and pharmacist about all prescription, over-the-counter, and other drugs you take. Also tell them about any vitamins, herbs, and supplements you use. Sharing this information can help you avoid potential interactions.

If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Antacids

Many antacids contain calcium carbonate, magnesium hydroxide, and aluminum hydroxide. These ingredients can bind to Cipro and prevent your body from absorbing it. This can decrease how well Cipro works.

To avoid this interaction, take Cipro at least two hours before taking an antacid, or six hours afterward.

Anticoagulant drugs

Taking Cipro with oral anticoagulant drugs such as warfarin might increase the anticoagulant effects. This might result in increased bleeding. If you take an anticoagulant, your doctor may need to monitor your bleeding risk more frequently if you take Cipro.

Drugs that prolong the QT interval

Certain medications prolong your QT interval, which means they might affect the rhythm of your heartbeat. Taking Cipro with these drugs can increase the risk of having a dangerous irregular heartbeat. Cipro should be avoided or used very carefully with these medications.

Examples of these medications include:

Clozapine

Ropinirole

Monitoring Response To Therapy

What are some common antibiotics used to treat UTIs?

Patients with a simple, uncomplicated UTI may not require rigorous monitoring. However, patients with complicated, relapsing, or recurrent infections should be monitored very closely. The following protocol is recommended to monitor response to therapy in patients with relapsing, recurrent, or refractory UTI.3

  • Recheck urine culture 5 to 7 days into antibiotic therapy. This confirms that the prescribed dose and frequency of the drug were successful in treating the organism isolated. This culture also may reveal an additional isolate that could not be identified in the initial culture. Any bacterial growth observed at this time suggests treatment failure. Reconsider the choice of antibiotic, dose, and administration frequency.
  • Recheck urine culture 3 days before discontinuing antibiotic therapy. This is an optional step, but it confirms that, when therapy was discontinued, the patient still had a negative culture. Positive bacterial growth at this stage suggests a refractory infection or newly inoculated organism. Investigate patients for any nidus of infection . Alter treatment and institute new therapy for the same duration as previously intended.
  • Recheck urine culture 7 days after discontinuing antibiotic therapy. Positive growth should prompt investigation for causes of relapse or reinfection.
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    Determinants Of Antibiotic Prescribing

    Results of uni- and multivariable analyses for guideline recommended treatments of uUTI are reported in Table . In multivariable analysis, only increasing age of the GP was significantly associated with reduced odds of prescribing any guideline recommended antibiotic treatment or a guideline adherent treatment .

    Table 4 Logistic regression analysis for guideline recommended and guideline adherent antibiotic prescriptions in uUTI

    Including all UTI patients, the diagnosis of a cUTI and the sex of the patient were additionally identified as significant determinants associated with reduced odds of prescribing fosfomycin, nitrofurantoin or TMP/SMX. In addition, the age of the GP and the diagnosis of a cUTI were significant associated with increased odds of prescribing any FC antibiotic in multivariable analysis. Particular noteworthy are the relative high intra-cluster correlation coefficient in multivariable analysis . Differentiating antibiotic prescribing patterns between patients with a uUTI and cUTI, a female gender of the GP in cUTI and increasing age of the GP in uUTI were associated with higher odds of prescribing a FC in multivariable analysis . Analysing determinants for each prescribed antibiotic separately showed results that are more heterogeneous and were provided in Supplemental Table c.

    Why Does My Dog Throw Up At 3am

    Vomiting is usually seen in the morning or late night just before eating, especially in dogs that are fed once daily. This might be due to prolonged periods between meals, or to related stomach inactivity, which aggravates the bile reflux. This condition is commonly seen in older dogs but can occur at any age.

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    Check If It’s A Urinary Tract Infection

    Symptoms of a urinary tract infection may include:

    • pain or a burning sensation when peeing
    • needing to pee more often than usual during the night
    • pee that looks cloudy, dark or has a strong smell
    • needing to pee suddenly or more urgently than usual
    • needing to pee more often than usual
    • lower tummy pain or pain in your back, just under the ribs
    • a high temperature, or feeling hot and shivery
    • a very low temperature below 36C

    Consider Switching Birth Control

    Antibiogram of Urinary Tract Infections (UTI) / 978

    Some older research suggests that certain contraceptives may contribute to the cause of UTIs in some women.

    If you use diaphragms, spermicides, or nonlubricated condoms and get frequent UTIs, it may be worth talking to your doctor to find other methods of birth control.

    Its not uncommon for UTIs to go away on their own with at-home care and without the use of antibiotics.

    Some research estimates that 25 to 42 percent of UTIs can go away on their own. This is usually only common in women with no other health issues.

    However, there are some serious risks that can come from leaving a UTI untreated, including pyelonephritis and .

    UTIs are painful, but with treatment, you can alleviate an infection and prevent recurrent infections. Talk with your doctor if you have symptoms of a UTI. With proper treatment, you should begin to feel better in a few days.

    Take your antibiotics as instructed even after your symptoms improve to prevent complications or a secondary infection.

    If the UTI doesnt resolve after antibiotic treatment or you end up with multiple episodes of a UTI, your doctor will likely do further testing.

    This could be in the form of:

    You may be referred to a urologist, depending on the severity of your UTI or if you have chronic infections.

    Certain strains of bacteria can cause UTIs. They can range from mild to severe. The degree of severity depends on multiple factors, including:

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    Antibiotics For Urinary Tract Infections

    Written by

    27 May, 2022

    Urinary tract infections are relatively common. Women are more affected by them due to the shorter length of their urogenital tract. In fact, its estimated that at least one in five women will suffer from some form of urinary tract infection throughout her life. UTIs occur in any part of the urinary system. This means that they can be located in the bladder, kidneys, ureters, or urethra. However, its estimated that 80% of cases are of infections in the lower urinary tract, or the bladder and urethra.

    The most common form of urinary tract infection is cystitis in women and prostatitis in men. In older adults, the incidence of the condition is similar in both sexes. Seasonal or geographical factors dont seem to have any influence on these cases. In this article, well take a closer look at what causes these infections and how antibiotics help treat them.

    Southern Cross Medical Library

    The purpose of the Southern Cross Medical Library is to provide information of a general nature to help you better understand certain medical conditions. Always seek specific medical advice for treatment appropriate to you. This information is not intended to relate specifically to insurance or healthcare services provided by Southern Cross. For more articles go to the Medical Library index page.

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    What Is The Prognosis For A Person With A Urinary Tract Infection

    Urinary tract infections typically respond very well to treatment. A UTI can be uncomfortable before you start treatment, but once your healthcare provider identifies the type of bacteria and prescribes the right antibiotic medication, your symptoms should improve quickly. Its important to keep taking your medication for the entire amount of time your healthcare provider prescribed. If you have frequent UTIs or if your symptoms arent improving, your provider may test to see if its an antibiotic-resistant infection. These are more complicated infections to treat and may require intravenous antibiotics or alternative treatments.

    What Is Metronidazole Used To Treat

    Antibiotic Awareness: Urinary Tract Infection (UTI), Cystitis or Bladder Infection

    Metronidazole is commonly prescribed to treat an infection called bacterial vaginosis. It is also prescribed before gynaecological surgery and surgery on the intestines, to prevent infection from developing. It can safely be taken by people who are allergic to penicillin.

    Metronidazole is also used, alongside other medicines, to get rid of Helicobacter pylori, a bacterial infection often associated with stomach ulcers.

    Metronidazole is available as a skin preparation also. This leaflet does not give information about metronidazole when it is used for skin conditions, but there is more information available in a separate leaflet called Metronidazole skin gel and cream.

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    Practice Good Sexual Hygiene

    Some sexual intercourse bacteria and other microbes into the urinary tract. Practicing good sexual hygiene can help to reduce this risk.

    Examples of good sexual hygiene include:

    • urinating before and immediately after sex
    • using barrier contraception, such as a condom
    • washing the genitals, especially the foreskin, before and after engaging in sexual acts or intercourse
    • washing the genitals or changing condoms if switching from anal to vaginal sex
    • ensuring that all sexual partners are aware of any current or past UTIs

    What Is A Uti

    A UTI is a bacterial infection in some part of your urinary system. Your urinary system includes all the organs involved in making and releasing urine :

    • Kidneys these filter your blood to remove waste and extra water to make urine .
    • Ureter two thin tubes of muscle, one on each side of your bladder, through which urine flows from your kidneys to your bladder.
    • Bladder where you store urine until you need to pee.
    • Urethra when you pee, urine passes along your urethra, a central tube that carries urine out of your body.

    Image: Urology Care Foundation

    When the infection is just in the bladder and urethra , this is called a lower UTI. If it travels up to affect one or both kidneys as well then it is called an upper UTI. This can be more serious than a lower UTI, as the kidneys can become damaged by the infection.

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    Who Gets Urinary Tract Infections

    Anyone can. But they’re more likely when you:

    • Are a woman
    • Have had UTIs before
    • Have a condition that affects your bladder’s nerves
    • Have been through menopause
    • Are overweight
    • Have something that blocks the passage of urine, such as a tumor, kidney stone, or an enlarged prostate
    • Use a diaphragm or spermicide for birth control
    • Have a catheter, a tube placed into the bladder to drain urine from the bladder into a bag outside the body
    • Are a man who has sex with men, has HIV, or hasnât been circumcised

    Most of these traits also raise the odds that a simple bladder infection may become a more serious kidney infection or turn into . For pregnant women, a kidney infection can lead to delivering a baby too early.

    Can I Become Immune To The Antibiotics Used To Treat A Uti

    Natural Antibiotics for the Urinary Tract

    Your body can actually get used to the antibiotics typically used to treat a urinary tract infection . This happens in people who have very frequent infections. With each UTI and use of antibiotics to treat it, the infection adapts and becomes harder to fight. This is called an antibiotic-resistant infection. Because of this, your healthcare provider may suggest alternative treatments if you have frequent UTIs. These could include:

    • Waiting: Your provider may suggest that you watch your symptoms and wait. During this time, you may be encouraged to drink plenty of fluids in an effort to flush out your system.
    • Intravenous treatment: In some very complicated cases, where the UTI is resistant to antibiotics or the infection has moved to your kidneys, you may need to be treated in the hospital. The medicine will be given to you directly in your vein . Once youre home, you will be prescribed antibiotics for a period of time to fully get rid of the infection.

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    Uncomplicated Cystitis In Nonpregnant Patients

    Uncomplicated cystitis occurs in patients who have a normal, unobstructed genitourinary tract who have no history of recent instrumentation and whose symptoms are confined to the lower urinary tract. Uncomplicated cystitis is most common in young, sexually active women. Patients usually present with dysuria, urinary frequency, urinary urgency, and/or suprapubic pain. Treatment regimens for uncomplicated cystitis in nonpregnant women are provided in Table 1, below.

    References
  • Gupta K, Hooton TM, Naber KG, et al. International clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of acute uncomplicated cystitis and pyelonephritis in women: A 2010 update by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the European Society for Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Clin Infect Dis. 2011 Mar. 52:e103-20. . .

  • Wagenlehner FM, Schmiemann G, Hoyme U, Fünfstück R, Hummers-Pradier E, Kaase M, et al. . Urologe A. 2011 Feb. 50:153-69. . .

  • Abrahamian FM, Moran GJ, Talan DA. Urinary tract infections in the emergency department. Infect Dis Clin North Am. 2008 Mar. 22:73-87, vi. .

  • Little P, Turner S, Rumsby K, Warner G, Moore M, Lowes JA, et al. Dipsticks and diagnostic algorithms in urinary tract infection: development and validation, randomised trial, economic analysis, observational cohort and qualitative study. Health Technol Assess. 2009 Mar. 13:iii-iv, ix-xi, 1-73. .

  • Foxman B. The epidemiology of urinary tract infection. Nat Rev Urol. 2010 Dec. 7:653-60. .

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