Tuesday, October 4, 2022

Urinary Tract Infection Urinating After Sexual Intercourse

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What Causes Urinary Tract Infections

What is a urinary tract infection or UTI?

Urinary tract infections are caused by bacteria in the urinary tract from:

  • Changes in the vaginal environment: The hormonal changes brought on during menopause can increase the likelihood of urinary tract infections.
  • Having sex: Sexual intercourse can push germs into the urinary tract.
  • Incomplete emptying of the bladder: If the bladder isnt completely emptied, bacteria may grow in its dark, moist environment. Some medical conditions, such as kidney stones, increase the risk of infection by making it more difficult to empty the bladder.
  • Using a catheter to drain urine: This thin tube increases the risk of infection.
  • Using a diaphragm for birth control: Diaphragms press against the urethra and may cause urine to stay in the bladder.
  • Wiping from back to front: Bacteria found in feces can enter the urinary tract and cause infection.

You can help reduce your risk of developing an urinary tract infection by:

  • Drinking lots of water or cranberry juice
  • Urinating after sex to flush out bacteria
  • Urinating when you feel the urge
  • Wearing loose-fitting cotton underwear

Signs of urinary tract infection include:

  • Burning or pain with urination
  • Feeling sick or tired
  • Pressure in the lower belly
  • Urine that is reddish in color, cloudy, or smells bad

Urinary Tract Infection Treatment At Dignity Health

If you think you might have an UTI, see your doctor for a proper diagnosis and treatment. To determine which treatment will work best, your doctor will order a culture of your urine to confirm the presence of bacteria.

Most urinary tract infections go away in a few days after treatment with antibiotics. Your doctor may also give you medicine to help you feel more comfortable as you recover.

If you get more than three urinary tract infections in a year, your doctor may recommend additional antibiotics. If your urinary tract infections tend to occur after sexual intercouse even if you urinate after sex a preventive dose of an antibiotic may be helpful.

Most women feel better soon after beginning treatment, so dont hesitate to seek out personalized care at any of Dignity Health’s Bay Area hospitals.

Uti Antibiotics And Escaping Arrest

I left with a prescription for prophylactic antibiotics, tears in my eyes and a searing pain in my crotch Running to the chemist, desperate to fill the script, desperate to pee, desperate to see the end and find a cure.

As I clawed my antibiotics from their foil wrappers, clutching my bottle of sickly sweet aloe juice, I was questioned by police. Clearly they saw the desperation in my eyes, my weight loss and a persona of anything less than stable. I was a junkie, an antibiotic junkie.

Between the prophylactic antibiotics, the invasive bladder inspection and the breakup of my relationship, my UTIs after sex stopped, for a time, for a time

I have had one since, years after sex had stopped causing me anxiety. And yes, it was late in the evening the night before a public holiday in my slightly provincial home town.

The eye roll I gave the pharmacist who suggested Ural, a urinary alkalinizer, has actually gone down in history. I nearly pulled a muscle in both optic nerves.

Id just had sex with a new partner. This reinforced my own newly developed theory that there are some men that I am just not compatible with on some basic biological, bacterial level. Swipe left, move along, body says no.

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Utis After Sex When It Really Kicked In

Years later all was forgotten, including my shift working boyfriend, and I found myself in another relationship with a man who could literally go for hours.

Were brought up to believe this is the ultimate quality in a lover but apparently excessive friction coupled with a short and narrow urethra does not equate to the best sex of your life to the contrary this was arguably the worst year of my life.

I began to realise that every time I had sex, I would get another UTI. UTIs after sex had officially become my modus operandi and post coital intimacy had been replaced by me sitting on a toilet trying to force a decent stream of urine from my body.

I couldnt help but wonder why it was happening in this relationship and not others? Id been in long term relationships and had never had this ongoing problem.

Was my boyfriend carrying bacteria that was reinfecting me each time we had sex? Was something happening in my own body that was causing some kind of imbalance in my urinary tract?

So How Do You Prevent Utis After Sex

Home Remedies For

If you are using spermicide-coated condoms or diaphragms during intercourse and keep getting UTIs after sex, you might want to rethink your method of contraception, because it could be making your vagina more friendly to the bad kind of bacteria. Spermicide kills the sperm, but it also may kill some of the healthy bacteria that are normal in the vagina, Goldman tells Allure. Then, when those healthy bacteria are killed or gone, some of the bacteria that you don’t want can take up residence in the vagina. Once they travel up the urethra, youve got a UTI.

Peeing right after sex might not necessarily be as crucial as you thought, but peeing regularly, in general, is definitely a good idea. One of the ways that women can prevent infections is that when bacteria gets in the bladder, hopefully, it kind of washes out when they go to the bathroom, Goldman says. The idea is to regularly flush out any bad bacteria that may be hanging around in your system before it gets a chance to build up.

Thats why its important to drink enough fluids so that youre peeing every few hours. And this is the case all the time, not just after sex. If some bacteria does get in there, and you’re totally dehydrated and you only go once a day, then what can happen is that bacteria is sitting there all day and has a chance to start dividing and causing problems, Goldman explains.

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What Else Can Help Prevent Utis

For starters, if you have to pee, dont hold it. Holding urine in the bladder for too long may allow any existing bacteria to proliferate, per the OWS. Also, its just straight-up uncomfortable. So go when you have to go. Here are a few other things you can do to reduce your risk of UTIs, according to the Mayo Clinic:

  • Wipe from front to back: This will help keep bacteria from the rectal area from entering the vagina and urethra when you wipe.

  • Drinks lots of water: Again, aim for 11.5 cups of liquid from both foods and liquids.

  • Avoid feminine hygiene products: First of all, you dont need them . Second, scented deodorant sprays or other products could irritate your genitals or even disrupt your vaginal pH, which could make you more prone to infections.

  • Maybe change your birth control: Some birth control methodslike diaphragms or spermicide-treated condomscan increase your chances of getting a UTI.

  • But if you get recurrent UTIs , talk to your medical provider about whats going on. They should be able to give personalized recommendations to help.

    Symptoms And Causes Of A Urinary Tract Infection

    The urinary tract is the system that produces urine and carries the urine out of the body. Sometimes germs get into this system, causing an infection.

    The most common type of urinary tract infection is called a bladder infection which is caused usually by bacteria getting into the bladder from the urethra. These infections are more common in women than men because women have shorter urethras making it easier for germs to get into the bladder.

    A bacterium that lives in the large intestines and is present in stool is the most common cause of infection. Sexual intercourse, especially in women, may also be a source for bacteria to get into the urinary tract. Catheters, for people who are hospitalized, are another common source for a bacterial infection. Bacteria that travel through the blood may also cause infections. Also, kidney stones and, in men, an enlarged prostate can cause infections by limiting the bodys ability to urinate.

    A person that is pregnant, had diabetes or does not drink enough fluids are at a higher risk for an infection.

    Some possible symptoms you may suffer if you have an infection are:

    pain or burning when urinating

    feeling of having to urinate often, but not much comes out

    tender or heavy feeling in belly

    cloudy or bad smelling urine

    pain in back where the kidneys are located

    fever or chills

    nausea and vomiting

    Your doctor will take a sample of your urine to test for any germs that cause bladder infections.

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    Incidence Of Urinary Tract Infection

    Thirty of the 138 total UTI events were excluded from the analysis because there were no diary entries to determine sexual intercourse on or during the month preceding the corresponding UTI date. Thus, 108 symptomatic, culture-confirmed UTIs with 105 CFU/mL among 78 women were included in the final analysis. Sixty-five symptomatic UTIs were identified via dipslide, while 43 were detected through review of clinical records. All UTIs were followed up by interview to verify the presence of at least 2 symptoms. Of the 108 confirmed UTIs with at least 2 symptoms, 91 had an acute urinary symptom recorded in the diaries within 7 days of laboratory confirmation, while 17 had symptoms only noted upon personal interview. Of those who experienced a UTI, 59 women had one UTI, 12 women had 2, 3 women had 3, and 4 women had 4. E. coli was the predominant uropathogen, identified in 83 of the 108 infections, while the remaining UTIs were caused by Klebsiella species , Proteus species , Enterococcus , group B Streptococcus , Enterobacter species , Citrobacter freundii , and unspeciated gram-negative rods . E. coli continued to predominate when analyses were restricted to the first UTI and when UTI was defined as 104 CFU/mL.

    What Are The Symptoms Of Painful Urination

    Ask The Doctor with Urologist Dr. Melody Denson – Urinary Tract Infections

    Symptoms of painful urination can differ between males and females, but both genders generally experience it as a burning, stinging, or itching feeling. The pain can be at the start of urination or after urination. Sometimes it can be connected to just complete sexual intercourse.

    Pain at the start of urination is often the symptom of a urinary tract infection. Pain after urination can suggest a problem with the bladder or prostate. For numerous male patients, pain can continue the penis before and after urination, too.

    Symptoms for female patients can be internal or external. Pain on the exterior of the vaginal area may be caused by inflammation or inflammation of this sensitive skin. An internal pain can be a symptom of a urinary tract infection.

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    How To Prevent A Uti After Having Sex

    To minimize the likelihood of bad bacteria entering your urethra, the easiest thing to do is to flush out the area naturally by urinating. Make it a habit to pee right away after every single sexual encounter involving your genital area, whether its masturbation or partner activity.

    Even if youre just using a sex toy by yourself, this can increase the likelihood of bacteria getting where its not supposed to be. Make sure to clean your sex toys after every single use and to pee every time after using them.

    The sooner you head to the bathroom after sex, the better aim for within 15 to 30 minutes after the end of sexual activity. It may be unsexy and inconvenient, but its a super important practice for your health.

    Research has shown that women who always urinate after sex have a lower likelihood of developing UTIs than women who rarely or sometimes do this.

    How Are Urinary Tract Infections Treated

    You will need to treat a urinary tract infection. Antibiotics are medicines that kill bacteria and fight an infection. Antibiotics are typically used to treat urinary tract infections. Your healthcare provider will pick a drug that best treats the particular bacteria thats causing your infection. Some commonly used antibiotics can include:

    • Nitrofurantoin.
    • Doxycycline.
    • Quinolones .

    Its very important that you follow your healthcare providers directions for taking the medicine. Dont stop taking the antibiotic because your symptoms go away and you start feeling better. If the infection is not treated completely with the full course of antibiotics, it can return.

    If you have a history of frequent urinary tract infections, you may be given a prescription for antibiotics that you would take at the first onset of symptoms. Other patients may be given antibiotics to take every day, every other day, or after sexual intercourse to prevent the infection. Talk to your healthcare provider about the best treatment option for you if you have a history of frequent UTIs.

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    How Is Painful Urination After Intercourse Treated

    Treatment for dysuria depends upon the cause of the pain. Determining whether painful urination is brought on by infection, inflammation, dietary factors or an issue with the bladder or prostate is the initial step in your treatment. Urinary tract infections are most commonly treated with a course of antibiotics.

    Inflammation brought on by inflammation to the skin is generally dealt with by preventing the cause of the irritant, Dysuria brought on by an underlying bladder or prostate condition is dealt with by dealing with the underlying condition.

    There are a number of steps you can require to decrease the discomfort of painful urination, including drinking more water or taking an over the counter painkiller to treat painful urination. Other treatments require prescription medications.

    If you struggle with regular urinary tract infections, your doctor can help check out the underlying reason for this condition.

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    Urinary Tract Infection And Antibiotics During Pregnancy

    Urinary Tract Infection

    Mothers are always at risk of havingurinary tract infection while pregnant. Defined as bacterial invasion of the organs of the urinary system, UTI is one of the common conditions that a mother can have during pregnancy. The ones most prone to have UTIs are those pregnant mothers who are on their 6th week to 24th week in pregnancy.

    UTIs may give the pregnant mother great discomforts during pregnancy. Some of the most obvious symptoms of UTI that the mother may feel are burning sensation upon urinating, frequent feel to urinate, pain in the lower abdominal area, urinating cloudy urine, fever, and in sometimes there is traces of blood in the urine. The pregnant mother can have UTIs when she fails to urinate and clean up after a sexual intercourse, forgets to thoroughly clean stools after defecating, and the increase of pressure of the abdomen to the urinary bladder because of the growing belly.

    When one thinks of UTIs, the first choice of treatment would always be taking of antibiotics to help get rid of the harmful bacteria that is invading the pregnant mothers urinary system. But as we all know, taking medications during pregnancy is discouraged because it can cause birth defects and complications. Most mothers are reluctant to take antibiotics because of the knowledge that it can harm their pregnancy.

    • Ampicillin
    • Cephalexin
    • Erythromycin

    It is safe to take during pregnancy and cures most UTIs.

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    Questions To Ask Your Doctor

    • Do I need any tests, such as urinalysis?
    • What is the likely cause of my urinary tract infection ?
    • Do I need medicine? How should I take it?
    • What are the possible side effects of the medicine?
    • When should I expect relief from my symptoms?
    • What symptoms would indicate that my infection is getting worse? What should I do if I experience these symptoms?
    • I get UTIs a lot. What can I do to prevent them?
    • Do I need preventive antibiotics? If so, should I be concerned about antibiotic resistance?
    • My child gets UTIs a lot. Could an anatomical problem be causing his or her UTIs?

    When To Call A Healthcare Provider

    Urinary tract infections require treatment with antibiotics. Even if a UTI is relatively mild, your healthcare provider will likely recommend a one- to three-day course of antibiotics.

    If a UTI is causing dyspareunia, it is typically due to frequent or recurrent UTIs that require more extensive treatment. In some cases, a daily, low-dose antibiotic may be prescribed for six months or longer. In postmenopausal women, estrogen replacement therapy may be advised.

    If a kidney infection develops, you need to seek prompt medical attention. If left untreated, pyelonephritis can lead to kidney failure and .

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    Are Utis Sexually Transmitted

    It is no secret that sex and urinary tract infections are linked, particularly in women. Frequency of sexual activity and exposure to spermicides are, in the words of Welk and Hickling , the only behavioural factors significantly associated with repeated UTIs.

    A link between sex and UTIs makes sense, of course, as vaginal sex places the female urethra in contact with bacteria from the genital area. The use of a diaphragm for birth control increases the risk of contracting a UTI further, as not only does the diaphragm itself limit the bladder’s ability to flush out bacteria, but the spermicides diaphragms are treated with can promote the growth of E. coli, the bacterium behind 85-90% of UTI cases.

    With such an established link between sexual intercourse and urinary tract infections, it begs the question what are the first UTI symptoms after sex? What are the earliest signs of the development of a UTI?

    What Are The Risk Factors For A Uti

    Sexually Active Women Should Pee After Intercourse To Avoid UTI

    Some people may have risk factors that make them get UTIs such as diabetes, kidney stones, or abnormalities in the urinary tract, Mamta Mamik, M.D., a urogynecologist at the Mount Sinai Hospital, tells SELF. If you have, consider yourself prone to UTIs. If this sounds like you, ask your doctor about treatment options and medications that you can take preventively or at the first sign of infection.

    However, if you never or rarely get UTIs and you don’t typically pee right after sex, this is permission to keep doing your thing. If it’s never been a problem for you, it’s fine to keep doing it , Dr. Mamik confirms. Maybe you’re typically healthily hydrated and have good, regular urination, or your body’s just great when it comes to preventing this bacterial invasion. Either way, sit back and be thankful for being UTI-free.

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